PBP USA Wiki

The PBP USA Wiki was created as a place to share information relevant to US riders going to PBP, wikipedia-style. No doubt much of the information may be useful for residents of other countries. Access the  PBP USA Wiki here.  

What is Randonneuring (Audax)?

How do you explain to someone why they should ride a long distance on a bicycle, through the night, through the wind, through the sun, through the cold, through the rain, through whatever conditions fickle fate decides to throw at you? [Puddle]

How to Avoid Heart Disease

Beyond Cholesterol — What Really Causes Heart Disease? According to Dr. Thomas Dayspring, a lipidologist (expert on cholesterol), and Director of Cardiovascular Education at Foundation for Health Improvement and Technology (FHIT), most heart attacks are due to insulin resistance. He has also stated that LDL “is a near-worthless predictor for cardiovascular issues.” Evidence suggests high …

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PBP Statistics

From Eric Nichols on the Randon group: A kind anonymous soul has put together this searchable website of all PBP results from 1931 through 2019: http://www.pbpresults.com/results It’s searchable by year, country, bike type, start group, etc. The 2019 numbers are probably unofficial results scavenged from various data sources. The finishing rate in 2019 was the …

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Deja Vous

This was my first recumbent, on which I completed PBP in 2003. The handling was excellent but the narrow high-pressure tyres gave it a harsh ride on rough roads and was almost impossible to ride on unsealed surfaces. The tailbox helped streamline the bike and also provided a large storage space which, along with the …

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Early Recumbents

Geared recumbents , as distinct from early front-drivers , first appeared in the 1890s, soon after the pneumatic-tired safety bicycle. Charles Challand , a professor in Geneva, built what was probably the first geared recumbent (Swiss patent 11,429 of 1895, British patent 6,748 of 1896). He called it the Normal Bicycle, because the rider‘s posture …

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